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are looking live now at the wreckage of asiana airline flight 214 at sfo. we have new information on the final seconds of that flight that are providing insight into what went wrong. i am terry dwyer. we'll get to the investigation. first we begin with new information on one of the teenagers who was killed and the concerns tonight that she may have been killed after the plane crash. nbc bay area cheryl herd is at sfo. she begins our expanded team coverage of the crash of flight 214. cheryl. >> diane, there's no doubt about
. when you see that wreckage on the runway or off the runway here at sfo. back to you guys in new york. >> adam, when you look at those pictures of the crash, a lot of people wondering how, in fact, did those people manage to get out of this aircraft. for miles people could see this fireball sitting on the runway. we were able to talk to different passengers there. how do they describe getting out of this aircraft? >> you know, it's interesting you mention that, clayton. one of the pilots i spoke to, watching all this coverage. i know them really well. talking about a couple of things. jet fuel isn't as flammable as gasoline. that allows you more time, buys you more time than years ago. while it takes a long time to get on and off of the plane. when we're in the back, seems like it takes forever. when you have a situation like this and all the doors open, you can get people off the plane, if there are not a lot of injuries on board, can you get them off in a minute or two. you can get to exit. it's that important to pay attention to where it is, because it's that much faster for you to
. >> in fact, more than 180 people were transported to 11 hospitals and the fire department here at sfo, there are three stations here, had no warning. all they were told, there was a hard landing. they had no warning of any distress. so when they arrived on the scene and saw the plane broken up, they had to go into action immediately, but they were not prepared for that. and san francisco airport is running at half capacity. there is some talk they will try to open up one runway -- one major one and one minor one are affected. as of right now, san francisco is running at half capacity. they hope to get one of the runways open today to move this process along. the entire process here probably won't be done for 5 to 6 days as they go through the crash site and remove all the debris here, as this investigation goes forward and the investigation itself, we are told, you won't hear back for potentially 8 to 9 months before we know for sure what happened. but we will get preliminary information from ntsb, later today in a press conference. >> back to you. >> thank you very much. >> fox news
going at sfo even with three of the four runways open. there is still no word on when the four the runway 28 left will re-open because the charred wreckage is still out there. it remains the focus of a major federal investigation. >> gregg: literally, shoulder by shoulder sweeping across the runway, picking up and looking through the evidence there. it will be a long-term before they open up 28l. claudia, thank you from sfo. we are getting a riveting account from one of the passengers on board the asiana plane showing how everyone helped one another. >> it was slow-motion. we could not believe it was happening. you did not know if you would be dead at the end of this or not. the plane stops. the person to my left was injure ed and was unconscious. i unbuckled myself. i was hurting but not too open. i opened the door. the door we managed to get up. this were no slides. i could see the debris but looking further, i told people, we okay, come down, come down. >> gregg: no slides. he said there was no warning by the pilot or crew before the plane stopped at the end of the runway. >
landed at sfo. tail ripped off. most everyone seems fine. i'm okay. surreal." and then, i mean, this is realtime. someone, it is a victim of a crash landing, a devastating crash landing, immediately takes to social media, just sends out the word before it's even on the radar of national media. then as he escapes from the plane, he turns back with his ipad and takes this video. we're going to show you. it's extraordinary stuff. all right, we'll have that video in just a second, but it really does raise questions for all of us about what the role is for traditional media. if citizen journalists can always get there first on the front lines and we are reacting to that, what is the role right now, jackie, of traditional media? >> i think it's a filter, i think it's a vet. because you have people in the moment, they're taking pictures, they're tweeting what's going on, but there is a -- there definitely is a role for gathering all of that and making sure that the story, what is actually happening is happening before their eyes, because you can't necessarily know when you're right th
learned today or at the end of the day yesterday that the guide path technology was not operational at sfo. the folks from sfo seem to suggest that that in no way shape or form should have played a role in what happened. mention about required systems. based on what you heard from the ntsb is there any suggestion that those systems could have helped prevent this if they would have been functional? >> i don't get the impression that the glide slope was the problem. it was a visual approach and pilots are trained to dot that without reference to the glide path. but i am concerned about the power being at idle whether thet auto throttles were engaged because the pilot is supposed to keep hands on the throttles for that reason and he is watching the speed decrease. as the speed decreases he starts to push the throttles forward whether the auto throttles do it or not. >> what does that tell you? >> i don't like to look back and quarterback what a captain has done or the co pilot. i can tell you that that is very unprofessional to not be in a position to control that aircraft regardless of what
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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